Wine Trends of the Canadian Rockies

Bonjour, Hello!

Kristen recently traveled with her new job to the Canadian Rockies area on the west side of Canada and carefully documented the wine trends and local grapes of the area.

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First stop: Vancouver

Vancouver, the famous western city of the Canada, was a surprisingly clean city. Not much trash to be seen on the streets and city hosts a large Asian influence with noodle shops and tea leaf importers on nearly every corner. The skyscrapers sparkle in the glow of the snow covered mountains that surround the city, and the light from the sun that reflects off the bay. Our hotel, the Georgian Court, was a stunning modern hotel that – with its spa-like features – won the award for best public bathrooms. They keep a beautiful Italian restaurant on the grounds that includes a jazz lounge, wine dinner room, and a classic bar.

 

Their menu offered lots of fun wine cocktails, my favorite being The Rose Garden. 

Its a mixture of elderflower liquor and black raspberry puree, topped with a sparkling rose wine. It was floral with a slight fruit finish that reminded me more of cranberry than black raspberry. It was not very sweet but instead felt like the alcoholic version of fruity green tea.

Second Stop: The overnight Via Rail train through the Rockies

If you have never experienced a Canadian train before, I highly recommend it! I will warn you that it is definitely NOT for anyone who hates small spaces. However, the train supports three lovely dome cars for viewing the scenery, and even serves a bottomless champagne toast as the train disembarks. The attendants poured the Angels Gate Brut VQA Beamsville Bench 2012 vintage which was 100% Archangel Chardonnay. The winery in located in the Niagara region of Canada. Niagara is home to many Canadian wineries, much like the Finger Lakes region in New York State. It was crisp and tasted of golden delicious apples with notes of citrus and peach. I highly recommend trying this vintage. The average price is around $29 per bottle.

 

The dining car also served some of Canada’s local grapes and local wineries. The first wine I tried was Union White: a blend of Riesling, Chardonnay, Gewurztraminer,  and Sauvignon Blanc from Ontario. It was the perfect match for my scallop and shrimp lunch. It bursted with citrus, white peach, and even a slight pineapple finish. It was bright and medium bodied with a slightly lingering finish.

 

The second was Konzelmann Estate Winery‘s Baco Noir also from Ontario. The Baco Noir grape is a native hybrid grape grown in parts of the USA and Ontario. I would say this wine was medium bodied and very fruit forward and slightly sweet. It reminded me of a less sweet version of blackberry wine. Rich and yet not very heavy on the taste buds. It will make a great pairing for Italian dishes!

Third stop: Jasper

This adorable mountain town feels like you finally made it to the north pole and Santa is busy working in the toy shop. Between the Christmas lights and wild elk constantly walking around the town, it’s hard not to feel nostalgic. The bitter cold was the perfect pairing for O’Sheas Irish Restaurant’s Mulled Wine special. The chef makes a fresh batch each morning and says it’s his grandmother’s recipe from Belgium.

It. Was. Incredible.

The balance of fruit, spice and sweet was unmatched by any mulled wine I’ve had before. The chef tops off each glass with warm pieces of citrus and it went perfectly with hot poutine and my buffalo burger. His recipe is a guarded secret but my guess is that a slightly sweeter red wine was used as a base with some brandy and fruit juices.

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Later that night, the Downsteam bar had a cocktail list that seemed longer than the Bible. I could not decide between the local wines and great cocktails so I challenged the bartenders to make me a drink that had both. I was not disappointed. They created a red wine whiskey sour made with local wine, maple whiskey, and topped with a few drops of maple syrup. The foam on top tasted almost candy like while the drink itself was fruity with a toffee finish. It has a thicker body than most cocktails, and the whiskey helped make for a clean finish. I have no idea how the drink is made, but I think I have some experimenting to do.

 

Fourth stop: Banff

Banff feels like the trendy younger sister of Jasper. It is still surrounded by gorgeous mountains yet the town is much more alive with a wild night life and slightly more youthful crowd. It’s a skiers paradise with trendy shops, restaurants, and a mountain gondola that will take you up to the clouds! Here we dined at the Maple Leaf which is a 5 star restaurant. A trend I noticed in Canada is that wine by the glass is not very popular. Most restaurants sell their wines by the bottle and can have extensive selections. In all honesty, we tried many wines that night from dry reds to crisp whites. I highly recommend asking the waiter’s advice because they are trained on the latest wine specials of the restaurant and will help match the meal you order. Hands down the best spot for wine pairing!

Last Stop: Calgary airport

Our last destination was the Calgary International Airport. We arrived early for our 12 pm flight and with limited options ended up at a Chili’s. To my surprise, they had a whole mimosa menu to choose from. My personal favorite was the Chambord Mimosa. This cocktail is a scoop of Frozen Top Shelf Margarita, a splash of Chambord, orange juice, grenadine, topped off with Martini and Rossi Asti Prosecco. It tasted like a tropical ice cream soda aka what you wish your aunt’s sherbet party punch tasted like. It was bubbly, creamy, fruity, and ice cold. My favorite way to wake up!

 

 

My fellow winos if you ever find yourself in the Canadian Rockies please try the local delicacies and tell us what you think!!

CHEERS!!!

 

 

Know your Bubbly

Like bubbly wine? SO DO WE!

However, do you get to the liquor store and freak out because you are seeing words you don’t understand like ‘Cava’, ‘demi-sec’, and ‘Frizzante’?

Don’t freak out! That’s why you have us!

Here’s the Half Past Wine O’Clock Bubbly Wine Guide!

Four Main Bubbles

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Cava
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Champange
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Prosecco (Image credit to Erlc L)
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Lambrusco

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BUBBLY chart 2

Words to Live by:

 

Sweetness Levels: (Least to greatest) 

Brut Nature – 1/8 tsp of sugar per 5oz glass

Extra Brut – 1/4 tsp of sugar per 5oz glass

Brut – 1/2 tsp of sugar per 5oz glass

Extra Dry – 3/4 tsp of sugar per 5oz glass

Dry – 1 tsp of sugar per 5oz glass

Demi-Sec – 2 tsp of sugar per 5oz glass

Doux – over 2 tsp of sugar per 5oz glass

Secco – Italian version of ‘Dry’

Semi-secco- Italian version of ‘off- dry’

Dolce/Amabile – Italian version of ‘Demi-sec’ and above

Frizzante – Italian word for ‘Bubbly’ and usually only has 1-2 atmospheres per bottle

*Fun Fact* The higher the atmospheres in the bottle, the smaller the bubbles!

Any other words on the bubbly bottles that you don’t understand? Let us know! We will do the research for you!

**** Information resources for this article are:

Winefolly.com – Liquid Caviar- Sparking Red Wine article, Wine Folly: The Essential Guide to Wine book, and Rachel Ray Magazine Jan/Feb 2016 edition pg 99.

Feature Image credit – Bubbly 1- to scyrene

Cute Summer Sips: “I Love You” All Year Round

We know we generally advise against picking a wine on bottle design, but the limited-edition design of The French Wine Merchant’s Prosecco was irresistible. It helped that we’re obsessed with bubbles and knew we’d love it from not just looking at the bottle, but reading it as well.

Whole Foods calls it “I Love You” All Year Round, though it is also (wordily) referred to as Villa Jolanda Vino Spumante Extra Sec (you’re more likely to find it online using the latter). The bottle, originally designed as a Valentine’s Day special edition, features a couple in hot air balloons together and hanging by the string of balloons as they fly solo.

11791746_10207349508001845_1880817746_nThe wine was a bit lighter than champagne, but still had the sweet, bubbly taste we craved. It was a dry white, light and perfect for our humid summer weather. We didn’t pair it with anything but end-of-the-day relaxation, but we’d recommend lighter meals like fish, or with snacks/appetizers.

The wine’s main set-backs have to be its cork and its rarity. Although its cork had a cute design on it, it was nearly impossible to remove – even for our wine expert, Kristen! And while rarity is usually a good sign, it’s sad to think we may never find this sweet, adorable wine again.

A bottle of I Love You All Year Round can range from $11.99-$16.99 and is around 13% alcohol.

Kristen: 4

Briana: 4

Paula: 5

Average: 4.3