We Tried Wine Made With Mold

On the surface, mold and wine don’t seem like a good combination. So when we heard about Tibouren Clos Cibonne rosé, we had to find out how a moldy wine tasted.

 

 

But before we get to taste, let’s talk about process. The winery that produces the rosé uses mold during the fermentation process. It rests in a layer on top of rosé’s barrel and is then filtered out at year later when the wine is ready. The mold, we’re assured, is “the good kind” – completely healthy, natural, and a contributor to the wine’s bold, full-bodied flavor.

Sourced from vines over thirty years old, the wine is 90% tibouren (a grape from southern France typically used to produce full-bodied rosés) and 10% grenache. The wine offers unique earthy flavors along with aromas of orange and spice. But don’t be fooled: this full-bodied rosé is just as fruity as most great pinks, bursting with color on the palate.

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We’d recommend it with all of our heart – if everyone else hadn’t beat us to it. The rosé consistently rates high among critics with each vintage produced. The one set back is the price tag. While it’s definitely worth the splurge, we know not everyone can justify over $30 on one bottle of wine.

But if you can, give it a shot. And don’t let the mold myths scare you away. Nature works in our favor with this one!

 

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A light rosé for heavy humidity

April showers turned into May humidity, but thankfully we have the perfect wine for a sweltering spring day. Subtle and light with just a bite of acidity in the finish, Luc Pirlet’s grenache rosé is the perfect pair to hot evening.

 

 

The French rosé offers delicate berry notes. Chilled, it is refreshingly cool and – in this weather – likely to create condensation on the glass. While we suggest pairing it with lighter foods, it’s subtle notes make it more refreshing than tasty when paired with food. Even on its own, the wine’s flavor is more of an undertone than a prominent element of the glass.

 

 

 

But what it does offer is the refreshing taste of berries, finishing with a chilled acidity that is sure to soothe the humidity. While not a recommendation for drinkers of sweet, darker rosés, it’s perfect for pink drinkers who see summer drinking as a time to cool off and enjoy the complexities of a French rosé.